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There are many different types of arthritis.  The most common ones are: osteo, rheumatoid, psoriatic and gout. Osteoarthritis (OA), commonly called degenerative joint disease, is one of the leading causes of musculoskeletal disability in Australia. It causes one’s joints to become inflamed which may cause pain, loss of movement, deformity and disability.

We love being able to help people move better and with less pain. If you want to find out how to reduce your arthritic pain, please click here.

OA can affect any joint, but it occurs most often in knees, hips, lower back, neck, small joints of the fingers and the bases of the thumb and big toe.

In 2011-12, 14.8% of Australians (or around 3.3 million people) had arthritis, with prevalence higher amongst women than men (17.7% compared with 11.8%). 

The prevalence of arthritis increases with age, from less than 1% of people aged under 25 years to 52.1% of people aged 75 years and over. It is more common in women aged 45 years compare to men. For people aged 75 years and over, 59.9% of women had arthritis whereas only 42.3% of men.(1)

General Symptoms:

·         Limited range of motion or stiffness that goes away after movement

·         Clicking or cracking sound when a joint bends

·         Mild swelling around a joint

·         Pain that is worse after activity or toward the end of the day

Region Specific Symptoms:

·         Spine: Loss of movement often occurs with pain at the affected area. In the neck, one can often hear a grinding/grating noise on movement. Changes to the joint include: bone spur formation, loss of disc height and disc bulges which may encroach on the spinal cord and nerves.

·         Hips: Groin or buttock area pain and may travel to knee or thigh

·         Knees: When the knees are moved a sensation of grating, grinding or scraping is often described

·         Fingers: Bony growths (bonespurs/osteophytes) at the edge of joints can cause fingers to become swollen, tender and red and it may be hard to open jars and door handles. There may be pain at the base of the thumb.

·         Feet: Pain and tenderness is felt in the large joint at the base of the big toe accompanied by the growth of bonespurs.  There may be swelling in ankles or toes.

Our chiropractors at Riverside Chiropractic, North Ryde, see many people who have found relief from their arthritic pain with chiropractic. We use spinal manipulative therapy (done either with the hand or via a hand-held instrument), mobilisations, soft tissue work, as well as advise on lifestyle, ergonomics and nutrition. Research has proven chiropractic is effective in helping to alleviate the pain and progression of osteoarthritis. 

To make an appointment today, please either phone 8096 6781 or contact us.

Sources:

(1) Effectiveness of manual physical therapy in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy: a systematic review